Compartment Syndrome & Acute Traumatic Ischemia Compartment Syndrome & Acute Traumatic Ischemia

Crush Injury, Compartment Syndrome, Acute Traumatic Ischemia

Medical Condition

Medical Condition

Name: Crush Injury, Compartment Syndrome, Acute Traumatic Ischemia

Alternate Names: Ischemic Injury, Ischemia, Traumatic Injury, Acute Injury, Ischemic Wounds.

Associated Anatomy: Tissues, Muscle, Blood Vessels and Nerves.

Causes:

Crush injury, compartment syndrome and ischemia occur when pressure is exerted on the internal tissues of the body. This can happen when the body becomes compressed between two objects or when there application of pressure to tissues from swelling inside the body and pressure on the outside of the body. Excessive pressure results in a decrease of blood flow as the blood vessels become compressed and unable to deliver oxygen to vital issues and organs. The lack of blood flow and oxygen leads to tissue death.

Symptoms of Crush Injury, Compartment Syndrome, Acute Traumatic Ischemia

Sign or Symptoms:

Symptoms include pain that does not respond to treatment, swelling and tightness at the site of injury, numbness or tingling in the affected area and electrical pain. Possible Treatment: Treatment for crush injury, compartment syndrome and ischemic injury include surgery (fasciotomy to reduce pressure), simply reducing pressure or removing the cause of the pressure by removing tight splints, dressing or casts. Other measures include the delivery of oxygen and pain medications. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve tissue vitality by supplementing oxygen to injured tissues and stimulating the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) to return adequate blood supply to the area of injury. In certain cases, the implementation of HBOT has prevented the need for surgery which reduces the cost and recovery time for patients.

Translate »